Snap Review: Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy

As one of the most recognisable gaming icons of the mid-ninties, Crash Bandicoot returns with a HD Remake of his first three adventures. He brings his typical blend of colourful craziness, anarchic box-bashing and all the platforming goodness that was offered when first released. But how well does a classic of this calibre hold up over two decades after the first was released?

  • Graphics: Simply put, Crash Bandicoot N.Sane Trilogy is one of the very best looking games you can pick up at the moment, and I do not say that lightly! Maybe I’m bias from early years playing a lot of Nintendo titles, but bright, colourful graphics have always been preferable to me than pixel-perfect realistic graphics. Viva Pinata looked better to me than Gears of War.
    The visuals were always a strong point on the original, and the remake continues that trend in glorious HD or Fur-K (4K for those that hate Puns. But who the hell would hate Puns?!) beaming bashfully bright visuals onto your television set!
    Many “HD Remakes” can suffer, in one way or another, from the port from the old to the new, I’m delighted to say that, at least on a graphic front, this is one solid remake of three sound titles. The game looks unbelievably great, and that’s what matters in this category.
  • Verdict: Yeah!
  • Audio: Bouncy jungle beats, tropical island drum circles and a certain taint of doom surrounding the underground audio tracks, the music in Crash really does have it all. Originally, the soundtrack was great. Over time, however, it has matured like a fine wine (in no small part due to the deficit of games of Crash’s nature) into a force of it’s own. Always apt with what is on the screen, always engaging and egging the player on and, most importantly, largely unchanged from the original. The soundtrack itself is far clearer and cleaner, as expected with two decades of audio technological advancement, but the actual tracks themselves are as you will remember them! They have avoided falling in the same audio pit that FFX/X-2 did with their remake
  • Verdict: Yeah!

  • Gameplay: Spin and win, bounce and pounce, slide and ride your way to victory through over one hundred unique levels! The core gameplay is largely untouched, if you loved the platforming clown-prince in years gone by, you will love it today!
    Almost everything about the remaster is a step in the right direction, looks great and plays great! Some minor quirks here and there, such as clipping on the environment or issues with the jumping momentum, are only really noticeable by those that played this game a lot many-a-year ago, which could be an issue given that those are likely to be the biggest demographic of those picking up this fantastic remake.
  • Verdict: Yeah!
  • Replayability: Spanning a huge variety of locations, coupled with a mind-boggling and Bandicoot-mangling arrays of deadly traps and enemies to overcome along the way, the core content available in the N.Sane Trilogy is hard to top. Add in to that the Time Trials, Gem Runs, and Platinum Trophies (one per game), achieving everything will earn its pound of flesh from you, should you choose to strive for that shiny shiny. While the “New” features may be few and far between, extending to the likes of Time Trials being added to Crash 1 & 2 and CoCo as a playable character, there is more than enough content here that has been polished to leave you not demanding much more.
    You may never want to spin again after earning all three Platinums, but it’s hard to say that you will not get your hours worth out of this title, even more so given the cheaper asking price of the game at £30-£35.
  • Verdict: Yeah!

    Final Thoughts: A “Yeah!” in each category and one of the very best remasters I’ve seen released thus far. You may struggle to track this game down for it’s first few weeks, but that is owing to the quality of the title, and the beloved nature of Crash Bandicoot across different generations!